illustration by Sally Chen 

TRYST #2: A RITUAL IN X MOVEMENTS

Artist Allie Wist and I collaborated for Montez Press' TRYST Series for the book A Ritual in X Movements, exploring the interesections of food, memory, and ritual. A gesture towrad the potential of unity, trust, and political and artistic dialectics, each installment of TRYST asks one visual artist and one writer to bring their unique perspectives to the table, letting their views and voices meet, marry, clash, and ultimately coalesce into an integrated and multifaceted work. Stay tuned for launch events!


CHAP CHAP!

It's here! My first chapbook, [ G A T E S ], is now available from Black Lawrence Press!
The cover was lovingly designed by the brilliant Yolandi Oosthuizen:

Check out this generous review by Keegan Finberg in the Southern Indiana Review, and this goofy interview I did with the blog Speaking of Marvels.

SOME WARM WORDS:

These charged, elliptical poems make space for the unknown and unknowable, even as they vividly summon the tangible
body of the world. Shot through with sudden glimpses of violence and beauty, Sahar Muradi’s poems refuse us comfort
or closure. They offer only what is—yet, paradoxically, haunt us with the sense that we’re standing on holy ground.

—Joan Larkin, author of MY BODY: NEW AND SELECTED POEMS

There is an unfettered, inviting, and wryly unconventional voice at work in [ G A T E S ], one capable of making the necessarily
enigmatic turns scale demands when distances known and felt on numerous levels have to be closed in on. These poems
animate and search through multiple lived-in centers that are real and imagined simultaneously, always open, and always irreducible.

—Anselm Berrigan, author of PRIMITIVE STATE and NOTES FROM IRRELEVANCE

Sahar Muradi makes sense of the fragments of memory, the broken buildings of Kabul, Mazar, and Panjsher, the innocence of
childhood punctured by journey, a father’s illness, losing a language, and the politics of a war uninvited. Muradi beckons you, asks
how you “authored poorer nations with the hope of freeing / others. The architects of what’s left.” Indeed the political act of poetry
in this fierce collection is a pained beauty that does not look away as it rebuilds the human starting with the heart.

—Rajiv Mohabir, author of THE COWHERD'S SON and THE TAXIDERMIST'S CUT